About Me

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Boston, MA, United States
Free lance Chef. A Middlebury, Vermont native, Chef Jon Sargent worked his way up through the ranks of kitchens starting as a dishwasher. His career in the kitchen has taken him across the country and back. Sargent moved to Boston first in 2005 where he helped open OM Restaurant | Lounge in Harvard Square, working under chef Rachel Klein. He then headed west to Wisconsin, taking a Sous Chef position at Stout's Island Lodge. Next he headed south, travelling to Naples Florida to work for the D'Amico Corporation with chef Andrew Wicklander. Back in Boston chef Jon worked as chef d' cuisine for Chef William Kovel at 28 degrees in the south end of Boston where he worked diligently on the restaurant's seasonal, globally-influenced menu. After taking up the ranks as sous chef at Catalyst restaurant in cambridge massachusetts, Jon has been on a journey of developing his style of cooking, and focusing on the development of his own restaurant.

Friday, May 17, 2013

So it has been a while since I have made a significant post on here. I recently gave myself the task of coming up with a quick reference guide of things that should be expected out of cooks in the kitchen, these also pertain directly to how one needs to live there life to be successful and organized. LEt me know what you think. Are these a little over the top or just a reiteration of common sense?







Quick Reference guide

JON SARGENT
©2013










TREAT EVERYTHING AS IF IT WERE YOUR OWN!
If we take care of everything we get to use here as if it were our own we will ultimately have more respect and ownership for our restaurant.

BE ON TIME Punctuation is very important in everything you do in life. This doesn’t just pertain to work. Being late shows everyone that this job is not important to you.

IF ITS EMPTY, FILL IT UP
When you wash your hands, and you use the last of the paper towels, don’t just leave it. No soap at the sink, its an empty bottle, change it out.  These are some examples. This pertains to your line set up as well. You run out of something in your mise en place, butter, salt, shallots, herbs whatever, don’t leave it empty, fill it up.



BE CONCIENCIOUS OF EVERY ONE AROUND YOU
This is probably the top responsibility of everyone in their life. If you see someone boiling cream over, shut it off, they are about to over reduce a gastrique, shut it off. They put toast in the salamander and its about to burn help them. They are weeded and your not, give them a hand.

GOT TIME TO LEAN, YOU GOT TIME TO CLEAN
There is nothing worse for a chef to see or a manager to see than their employees doing nothing. When we are at work we are to be occupied with something. There is always something to learn or do just ask, or look around. Consolidate containers, organize walk-ins, wipe out the coolers, and clean the seals on the reach in doors.

IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS
If you are uncertain of anything, or have questions about anything at all, go to your chef, if he is unavailable go to the sous chef, if neither are there go to the general manager. follow the chain of command.



NEVER PUT KNIVES IN THE DISH AREA!!!!!!!!!!
This is common sense I hope. This is so dangerous, if anyone lost a finger or cut their arm, I would make it the responsibility of the person who put that knife in the dish area responsible for paying for the stitches!!!

NEVER ROLL A BOIL ON A STOCK!!!!!
Standard operating procedure for a meat stock,  in a stock pot full of water bring bones up to a boil, add the mierpoix  (stock Veg) reduce temp to a simmer. Always a simmer.
Vegetable stock: Place mierpoix in large stock pot, just cover the veg by an inch of water, bring to a boil and hold at a simmer for 1 hour. Strain and cool reserve veg.

COOKING ON THE LINE
We are on stage all of the time act appropriate, be respectful of each other and stay clean.

EMUSLIFICATION!
This is an easy thing to take fore granted, consistency tells all, watch for the separation of oil, this will tell you to slow down the oil, or add water, its all by feel for the most part. If you are uncomfortable making aioli’s and emulsifications, talk to me we will get you on the right track.



SPEAKING OF CLEANLINESS
Everyone is expected to do their part, no one is exempt from having to do dishes, scrub floors, clean hoods, plunge toilets or take out the trash. If it is needed to be done then take initiative. Keep your area organized! How you think in your life is a direct reflection of your work ethic, keep an organized thought process and ambition and you will be successful. Keep your aprons and jackets clean, we will be seen. Keep the floors swept and dirty dishes cleared trashes not over flowing, these are all responsibilities in our stations.

PRODUCT ROTATION
Be aware of the dates of product you are using, label everything you touch! When you rotate proteins, this is the chefs method, on a piece of deli paper write the date the product originated on, the name and quantity of the product and your initials.
When consolidating containers, copy the label from the original container.
REMOVE THE LABLES FROM OLD CONTAINERS BEFORE THEY GO TO THE DISH WASHER

BE PATIONATE AND LOVE WHAT YOU DO
When you care about what you do and love everything about it, you can taste that in the product you finish with. Putting care and respect towards all your products and processes will make you great.

PUNCHING IN AND PUNCHING OUT
When you punch in you are  ready to start working, this means you are changed into your brigade and ready to step on station. When you leave the kitchen to go home you punch out before changing when your work is done. Always check with the chef before leaving work!





THE MOST IMPORTANT WORDS YOU WILL EVER KNOW


“YES CHEF"   


DON’T FORGET THOSE WORDS!